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Facial Nerve

Temporalis Tendon Transfer

The temporalis muscle is situated on the side of the head and is one of four major muscles used for chewing. It attaches to the jaw bone (mandible), and it helps to close the jaw when chewing. The muscle, and its bony attachment, can be cut through a skin incision that is placed in a ... Read More »

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Static Sling

The most time-tested treatment for facial paralysis involves a facelift on the paralyzed side of the face combined with a soft tissue “sling” used to pull up the corner of the mouth. In this procedure, tissue called fascia is harvested from the thigh through a surgical incision. Fascia is a form of connective tissue, which ... Read More »

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Gracilis Free Muscle Transfer for Chronic Facial Paralysis

The gracilis muscle transplant procedure has the ability to restore moving, functional muscle to the face. This is particularly useful in cases of long-standing facial paralysis, also called chronic facial paralysis. The procedure involves harvest of muscle from the inner thigh through a surgical incision. The gracilis muscle is detached, including its blood vessels and ... Read More »

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Nerve Transfer Surgery for Facial Paralysis

In cases of facial nerve paralysis that have lasted, in general, one year or less, a nearby motor nerve can be connected to a portion of the facial nerve in order to restore movement. The most common of these procedures is called the masseter-to-facial nerve transfer. This involves the use of the nerve to the ... Read More »

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Physical Therapy for Facial Paresis and Synkinesis

Following any severe facial nerve injury, including Bell’s palsy, it may be helpful to undergo electrodiagnostic testing in order to determine the prognosis for spontaneous recovery. Fine, sterile needle electrodes are used to determine the electrical activity of facial muscles, even when they are not able to move the face in a manner visible to ... Read More »

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Electrodiagnostic Testing After Facial Paralysis

Following any severe facial nerve injury, including Bell’s palsy, it may be helpful to undergo electrodiagnostic testing in order to determine the prognosis for spontaneous recovery. Fine, sterile needle electrodes are used to determine the electrical activity of facial muscles, even when they are not able to move the face in a manner visible to ... Read More »

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Trigeminal Neuralgia

Trigeminal neuralgia is an intensely painful neuropathic disorder that is characterized by episodes of severe pain in the face. This pain originates in the trigeminal nerve, one of the nerves that passes through the cranial base.

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Facial Spasm

Facial spasm is a rare neuromuscular disorder characterized by involuntary and irregular muscle contractions or spasms on one side of the patient’s face. These spasms result from a normal artery that may compress the facial nerves as they pass through the cranial base.

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Synkinesis

Some patients who have had Bell’s palsy or other reversible forms of facial nerve injury may go on to develop synkinesis. This is a condition that causes unwanted contractions of the muscles of the face during attempted movement. Most commonly, patients will notice forceful eye closure when they attempt to smile, or other muscle spasms ... Read More »

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Keck Medicine of USC
Univeristy of Southern California
Keck Medicine of USC
Keck Medicine of USC
Keck Medicine of USC is the University of Southern California’s medical enterprise, one of only two university-owned academic medical centers in the Los Angeles area.